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3parts:

The Art of Thief || Garrett

"We tried to keep Garrett’s character and personality largely intact from the previous games. Garrett is a self-enforced loner because of what he does and because emotions and relationships only tend to get in the way. Therefore he tries to remain self-sufficient without too many people in his life who he would call ‘friends’. He thinks a lot more than he says and knows a lot more than he lets on. When he speaks to himself he’s often more insightful and poetic than he is when he’s addressing others."

—Rhianna Pratchett

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mistahgrundy:

krishva:

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Were you born to raise hell? The biggest thing since World War III? If so, maybe you should contribute to my upcoming fanzine for the animated cult classic Rock & Rule

Possible submission ideas include:

  • Character portraits
  • Illustrations and comics inspired by the film or your experience with the film
  • Short essays, poetry, and other written works
  • Anything else that can fit onto an 8.5” x 11” sheet of paper folded in half. Think you can design a papercraft Mok? Great! I wish you well on your hellish journey of discovery.

It’s an open field. Just keep the content PG-13ish (if you feel your idea is on the upper edge of that threshold, please ask anyway!).

COMPENSATION

Since this is fan work, it’s not a paid gig. Every contributor gets a high-res PDF to print off and independently sell at conventions/zine fairs/expos/etc. if they so choose. It won’t be sold online. This is just for fun!

HOW TO SUBMIT

If you’re interested, please contact krisjacque AT gmail DOT com with your idea. If you want to do a character portrait, weigh in early. I don’t want to wind up with nothing but pictures of Mok!

Images/comics should be roughly 6.5” x 8.5” at 300 DPI, minimum. Grayscale or B/W lineart only.

Deadline is November 15, 2014. 

you know you want to do something for a rock and rule fanzine, YOU KNOW IT!!

hisoker:

THATS HOW THE DO THEY PATTERN THING THE SQUARE THING MY WEEABOO HEART IS YELLING

(Source: vine.co)

grypwolf:

Ahhahah I didin’t have all the progress images but NO MATTER. Started making this when I still had summer vacation. Finished it just now.
Full image in deviantart

bridgioto:

Bravest Warriors #24 is coming out next week, with this cover I did for it! Here’s some of the process work - I included some explanations this time. I don’t know if it’ll be helpful at all or just… verbose… but hopefully there’s something useful in there :>

1. Thumbnail

2. Tight sketch

3. Rough values painted underneath the sketch

4. Value painting on top of the sketch to tighten things up

5. Flat colors! Regular area fill for set pieces, and a few color/overlay layers to quickly indicate hues in the painting

6. Set lighting: using multiply layers to indicate the overall scene lighting raking across the wall, working out how that will interact with the portrait painting and lead the eye. Also continuing to paint in regular layers on top of the portrait.

7. Warming/brightening up the scene lighting, picking out highlights on the frame, softening some form shadow edges to add dimension, adding some rimlight to Catbug. Continuing to work up the portrait. Adding occlusion shadows under the frame and curtains.

8. Using a lighten layer to better expose and unify the areas of the scene struck by light. Lightening the shadow areas a bit to raise overall tone and prevent stuff from getting lost or too dark.

9. Pushing the lights even further to get a stronger afternoon-light feel and create better separation between light and shadow. Adding a soft glow around the light edges. And dust mote sparkles! :>

artrubzow:

Saw this today on facebook and thought I might share. Since this is how I think about forms and shapes. You can use this for full rendering as same as shading with a pencil.

Original post from __ Michal Macko  // his website 

Hi! Do you have any tips on drawing body figures? Especially the length of the legs? And do you have tips on drawing hands? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Only way to learn figures is to look at them and draw them.  I’ve taken figure drawing and anatomy for artist classes in addition to drawing a lot.  Take them if you can!  And I fuck up legs more than anything because I don’t draw them enough.  Easy springboard though is searching for Andrew Loomis books.

Same with hands, though there are some fairly easy to describe formulas for hands so I drew up a couple rq

First of all, for probably 90% of the hand poses you’re gonna draw, think fingers like the petals on a pinwheel.  They all curve the same degree, in relation to the previous.  

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You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

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start to put on features

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fix stuff

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put on more stuff

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fix stuff again

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erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

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2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

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That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!

Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

jakewyattriot:

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…image

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

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Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

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And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:image

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

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Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

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Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

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Layered, interior spaces:

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You get the idea.

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Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

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Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

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4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you.

-Jake Wyatt

I was wondering how you manage to make your faces actually look like the person they are meant to look like? Some of my facial features always end up looking the same, and yours are so perfect... *showers you with love* You are my art guru.
Anonymous

thetuxedos:

art guru!!!!

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ART GURU.

BUT NO in all seriousness, thank you! You’re a sweetheart! ;O; Proportions are pretty awful to get down when you’re just starting out, and while there are a bunch of ways you can start practicing with it, it’ll be difficult to be absolutely precise. I still struggle with proportions occasionally. Fun fact: I don’t post all of my work. I only post the work that turned out okay aHA. So basically don’t be frustrated when every single piece doesn’t turn out. Here are a few tips.

Let’s use this picture of Laurence and Hugh because why not.

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They’ve both got eyes, a nose, and a mouth, so why do they look different?

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These lines are the generic way of mapping out where to put things together. I used this when I was starting out and it’s a helpful way of getting your hand and wrist to work together. At this point they both nearly look the same. I say this a lot, but I think it’s important: shape is what puts a drawing together.

Compare features of the face to help you figure out placement.

For example:

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The bottom of his ear lines up right to the middle of his nostril. His tear ducts line up right at the corners of his mouth. Then you can get super technical and say, oh, the outer corner of his eye lines up with that fold in his collar and then from there you can see other things like the approximate distance from the edge of his mouth to that connecting line from the eye to the collar. They don’t meet so his mouth is smaller than the width of his eyes, etc, etc. Whatever works, man.

This is a favorite technique of mine so lemme use another example:

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Eventually you get to the point where most of your proportional accuracy will come from just looking. You will eventually adjust your eye to see what makes a person who they are by the shape of their features.

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Laurence has narrow, oval shaped eyes, while Hugh has more of a diamond shape. Not everyone has perfect almond shaped eyes. You can capture an entire character personality through their eyes alone, so shaping them out is extremely important.

The way you draw your lines is also important. Sharp and smooth lines will give your drawing personality. Reveals the character, in a sense.

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Other things to consider: the shape of the nose.

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Mads’ is flat and goes down in a steady slope, while Hugh’s juts out in a smooth, almost concave curve.

SHAPES SHAPES SHAPES. Use shapes and structure to find proportion.

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I did a lot more than I anticipated omg. Oh gosh and I have a feeling I kinda just rambled and didn’T MAKE ANY SENSE AH. Let me know if you need more help or if I was speaking gibberish I am so bad at putting my thoughts into words aHHHH. But gosh I hope this was at least vaguely helpful. You’re a darling and thank you for your kind words!

Good luck on your artistic endeavors! /hugs